Blog

Karate VS. Hapkido

Over the years of being a martial arts institute, a common question asked by many new students and others interested in our program has been, “What is the difference between Hapkido and Karate?”  To the untrained person or someone unfamiliar with the martial arts, Hapkido may seem no different from other martial arts like Karate, but in fact they are very different!

Lets take a look at these differences to clear the air on what Hapkido is all about!

HAPKIDO

Hapkido is a Korean word meaning “coordinated power-way.”  This means when doing a technique, the body creates a synergy bringing together a students mind, body, spirit to act as one.

KARATE

Karate is a generic Japanese term meaning “Empty Hand.”  Being a more generic term, there are many different styles of Karate.

HAPKIDO

Hapkido uses a relaxed natural posture that allows you to move as you strike.  This also allows a free flow of energy into a students technique.

KARATE

Karate uses more rigid, strong stances as a pre-set fighting position often to intimidate your opponent.

HAPKIDO

Hapkido is considered both a “hard and soft” style meant to redirect your attackers energy with soft free-flowing joint locks combined with strategic striking.

KARATE

Karate is defined as a “hard” style using direct blocking, kicking, and punching.

HAPKIDO

Hapkido striking is very strategic attacking the body at a precise angle and location designed to temporarily disable, render unconscious, or bring severe pain to your attacker.

KARATE

Karate striking is mostly “sport style” designed to score points during a match.  It is also used for full contact striking with an abundance of force to “knock” your opponent out.

HAPKIDO

Hapkido uses a “Kiap!”  A technique of vibrating your molars to stimulate the pituitary gland which then activates the adrenal gland in the body to produce “Ki” power releasing one’s inner energy.

KARATE

Karate uses a “Kiai” often used to startle or scare their opponent.

HAPKIDO 

Hapkido is realistic self-defense applying both physics and anatomy.  Its objective is not to “beat” anyone up, but to keep someone from “beating” them up.  This is usually done with compliance with pain as the first alternative.

KARATE

Karate is primarily practiced as a sport in tournaments for point sparing or demonstrating pre-arranged techniques in the form of a Kata to be judged.

As you can see, there are many difference between the art of Hapkido and the art of Karate.  We hope this article will be helpful to anyone looking to get involved in martial arts and decide what is best for them!